BrokeAss Gourmet

BrokeAss Gourmet

Gluten-Free Pizza Dough

  • Prep Time 1:15
  • Cook Time 0:17 (for pizza)
  • Estimated Cost $10.50
  • 6 Comments

But I wasn't going to post any old dough recipe, just because it happened to be gluten-free. No, I was going to find the tastiest, chewiest, crispiest-edged pizza dough recipe--one that can also be prepared without buying seven different flours and chemical dough elasticizers. Because if it's not affordable and simple, it's not for this website. 

If you know me, you know I don't like being told what to do.

If you know me well, you know that, not only do I not like it, but it's a totally ineffective way to get me to jump on your bandwagon. I hate bandwagons. I don't understand the Cult of Mac. I will never say "YOLO." I don't see what's so special about Ryan Gosling.

And so, when an onslaught of people started telling me to make a gluten-free version of my signature pizza dough recipe, I rolled my eyes. "This isn't a gluten-free blog! JEEZ!" I would have snapped at them, if I weren't so afraid of confrontation.

I made a habit of nicely redirecting those in search of glutenless pastures to the plethora of excellent gluten-free blogs on the internet, specifically the fantastic Sauna Ahern's Gluten Free Girl And the Chef--she knows what she's doing in the gluten-free department.

But then, I started working on my second cookbook, all about pizza dough (due out Fall 2013), and reached out to my friends and readers, as bloggers-turned-cookbook-writers are wont to do, and I started hearing it over and over again:

Ooh! I've missed pizza, ever since I went gluten-free.

Hey Gabs, any chance you can de-gluten-ify that pizza dough for me? 

Me like pizza. Me no like gluten.

Stupid gluten. 

Ooookaaaay. So, it sounds like this gluten-free thing is perhaps bigger than I had anticipated. From Celiac disease to slight gluten intolerance, more and more people were learning to live without gluten. And what is a life without pizza? 

But I wasn't going to post any old dough recipe, just because it happened to be gluten-free. No, I was going to find the tastiest, chewiest, crispiest-edged pizza dough recipe--one that can also be prepared without buying seven different flours and chemical dough elasticizers. Because if it's not affordable and simple, it's not for this website. 

 

Gluten-free pizza dough

Anyway, after a week of recipe testing and experimentation, I learned a few things:

  • Gluten-free dough neither behaves, nor tastes exactly like regular wheat dough. It's not going to be kneadable, rise in the same way, or stretch, but that doesn't make it any less delicious.
  • Pre-baking is your friend. Pre-baking the crust means you can load it up with extra-toppings without worrying about it getting soggy.
  • It's all about the olive oil. Gluten-free doughs can dry out easily. Counteract with a liberal brushing of delicious olive oil.
  • There is no reason to advertise the fact that your pizza is gluten-free. Because if you say, "Hey, try this pizza I just made!" they'll gobble it up without asking questions. 

Ingredients

  • 1 packet yeast $1.50 for 3
  • 1/4 cup warm (about 110 degrees F) water
  • 2 tsp sugar or honey Pantry
  • 1 1/2 cups gluten-free all-purpose flour (my favorite is the Gluten Free Pantry kind from Glutino--it's also the cheapest available) $3.50 for 16 oz.
  • 2 tbsp whole psyllium husks (available in the supplement aisle) $5.50 for 16 oz.
  • 1 tsp salt Pantry
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil, plus more for brushing Pantry
  • cornmeal (optional)

Recipe Serves 4

Directions

  1. Combine the yeast, water and sugar or honey in a small bowl. Stir gently, then let sit for 2-3 minutes, to activate.
  2. Combine the flour, psyllium and salt in a mixing bowl, or the bowl of a stand-up mixer. Gently stir in the olive oil and the yeast mixture. You may need to add a more warm water, a little bit at a time, until a soft dough forms. It should be about the consistency of traditional biscuit dough.
  3. Gather the dough into a ball and put it back in its mixing bowl. Cover with a clean dish towel, and let rise for an hour (it won't increase in size much, but the flavor will develop immensely and the texture will improve).
  4. If you plan to make pizza at a later time, put the dough in a lightly-oiled zip-top bag, squeeze the air out of it, and put it in the refrigerator where it will keep for up to a week.
  5. If you want to make pizza now, preheat the oven to 450 degrees F, and sprinkle cornmeal over the bottom of a large baking sheet or pizza pan (or line with parchment).
  6. With lightly oiled hands, press the dough out on the prepared baking sheet into 1 14" circle or 2 7" circles.
  7. Use a pastry brush to coat lightly with olive oil.
  8. Bake for 10 minutes or until the crust is firm.
  9. Put on toppings (check out my pizza recipes for topping combination ideas).
  10. Bake for 14-17 minutes, or until the cheese is bubbly and lightly browned.
  11. Let cool for a few minutes, then cut into wedges.

Category: Meals

Tags: , ,

Share this Recipe: Share on Facebook Tweet This! Pin it on Pinterest

Leave a Comment

Textile help (For formatting your comment)

What They're Saying

cathy @ Noble Pig, on Dec 14, 12:17 PM, wrote:

Ah yes, sometimes we must give in…I’m sure many will be apprciated!

Sarag, on Dec 18, 01:23 PM, wrote:

Love you book and blog. I’m recently gluten free and try to adapt most of your recipes to gluten free. I’m so excited to try this pizza dough recipe and i’m looking forward to your pizza cookbook. Thanks for giving in to the request

Eric Henao, on Dec 20, 06:59 AM, wrote:

Quote: “I don’t understand the Cult of Mac. I will never say “YOLO.” I don’t see what’s so special about Ryan Gosling.” God, i think I love you. Will have to try this recipe out. I haven’t made dough yet, but this just might be the inspiration I need…

Chat 2 Friend, on Dec 28, 12:01 AM, wrote:

Excellent tips & method about recipes, you have a wide range of indian recipes list available, helpful site – thanks
Indian Racipes

Sam T, on Feb 1, 08:46 AM, wrote:

This recipie is fantastic!!! My new go to for dough. I like that you use psyllium instead of xanthum gum because the fiber content makes it much healthier! I made a slight variation and used some buttermilk instead of water to activate the yeast. This was a fantastic choice! It almost makes the dough taste like sour dough bread, something I’ve missed a lot since giving up gluten.

caitlyn, on Nov 9, 07:59 PM, wrote:

What is a phusiylum husk?