BrokeAss Gourmet

BrokeAss Gourmet

Apple-Onion Tartlets with Cheddar

  • Prep Time 0:15
  • Cook Time 0:45
  • Estimated Cost $8
  • 5 Comments

Ooh, these are so good.

Sweetness from the caramelized onions and apples is contrasted delightfully with salty cheddar and spicy black pepper. Make them for brunch, or a light supper, served with a green salad.

Ingredients

flour for baking and rolling Pantry
2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil Pantry
2 medium onions, sliced thinly $1
1/2 tsp each salt and black pepper Pantry
1 recipe pizza dough $1.50
2 Granny Smith apples, cored and sliced thinly $2
1/2 cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese $3.50 for 8 oz.

Recipe Serves 4

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Lightly flour a baking sheet and set aside.
  2. Heat the oil in a large frying pan over medium-low heat. Add the onions and stir a few times, to distribute the oil evenly. Add the salt and pepper and stir again. Cook for 18-20 minutes, allowing to caramelize, stirring once or twice throughout cooking.
  3. While the onions caramelize, divide the dough into 4 even balls on a lightly floured surface. Use your hands or a rolling pin to roll each ball out into a 6" circle. Set the circles on the prepared baking sheet (it's OK if they touch--they won't when you're done assembling the tartlets).
  4. Arrange about half-an-apple's worth of slices on a circle (as if you were making apple pie) in the center of one of the dough circles. Make sure to leave about 1 1/2 inches of dough at the border.
  5. Top the circle of apples with about 1/4 of the caramelized onions.
  6. Fold the border of dough in, to form a tartlet (it's supposed to look rustic, so don't worry about making it look perfect). Sprinkle the whole thing (crust included) with about 1/8 cup cheddar cheese.
  7. Repeat the tartlet-making process with the remaining ingredients.
  8. Bake for 18-22 minutes, or until the crust is golden-brown and the cheese is bubbly.
  9. Serve whole or cut into wedges.

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Elephantschild, on Apr 2, 01:53 PM, wrote:

A group of friends helped me make this; it was easy and a lot of fun! The results were tasty, too, but we had a few suggestions. The filling seemed dry, so we thought putting down a layer of pesto or cream sauce would be delicious. Or the extreme solution: add bacon! I would make this again, with some creative modifications :)

PJ, on Apr 2, 02:04 PM, wrote:

I wonder how safe this is, given the possibility of tuna cans with BPA? I’m assuming that heating a container not intended for cooking doesn’t do you any favors.

I’m also surprised that this prep actually imparts any smokiness. It does sound tasty, and I’ll probably try it (after dumping the tuna into a tiny cast iron skillet).

PJ, on Apr 2, 02:07 PM, wrote:

Not sure why my previous comment ended up here, I was commenting about the smoked tuna salad dish. Not sure if you can move or delete comments, but these two are probably worth erasing…

Littlest Crazy, on Apr 11, 08:45 AM, wrote:

Can’t wait to try these. Thanks for the post- I make a lot of your recipes!

Steve, on May 21, 10:09 PM, wrote:

A cheap and easy way to get fresh herbs is to grow your own in a window box or as potted plants. This works very well with celantro, chives and rosemary. Snipping off a few sprigs of rosemary from a plant you’ve cared for adds a little savory to your dish and also adds a feeling of accomplishment!